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Needing More Water and Making Use of Recyclables April 24, 2009

Posted by kbianews in KBIA.
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Business Beat 04/22/09

This week, researchers, industry leaders, and entrepreneurs are gathered in Columbia for the Missouri Energy Summit, and all the talk is on the environment. KBIA’s Steve Weinman looks at a report released by the Argonne National Laboratory that says Missouri will be using a staggering amount of water for corn-based ethanol production by 2030. And then Ashley Crimaldi talks to Gary Ryan of Ryan Enterprises, who transforms discarded waste into new agricultural products.

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UMKC Professor says Fraud at Center of Banking Crisis April 10, 2009

Posted by kbianews in KCUR.
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UMKC Associate Professor of Economics and Law Bill Black

UMKC Associate Professor of Economics and Law Bill Black

Bill Black’s Conversation with Frank Morris

It seems logical that banks caught stuck with billions of dollars in worthless assets got into that mess by mistake. But, that’s not how UMKC law and economics professor Bill Black sees it. In Kansas City, Frank Morris spoke with Black who says an administration hostile to regulation allowed mortgage bankers to write “liars loans,” which they knew were based on bad information and allowed rating agencies and investment bankers to cash in on the charade. Now, Black says the Obama administration is helping to obscure the enormous mess, one riddled on all levels by a single element – fraud.

Click here for more on the story from Bill Moyers at PBS.

Faces of Unemployment: Missouri Rates Getting Worse April 9, 2009

Posted by kbianews in KBIA.
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Wes Winberry waits to speak with a counselor at the Missouri Career Center in Columbia.

Wes Winberry waits to speak with a counselor at the Missouri Career Center in Columbia.

Business Beat 04/08/09

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that more than more than 250,000 Missourians were unemployed and looking for work in February. In the first part of a series on unemployment, Columbia’s Courtney Flatt has the story of Wes Winberry who was recently laid off from his job at MBS Textbook Exchange in Columbia. As people, like Winberry, continue to apply for unemployment benefits and look for jobs, the non-profit Missouri Budget Project reports Missouri’s unemployment rate is getting worse. In Columbia, Taylor Reeh talks with the group’s Executive Director Amy Blouin about what this means for mid-Missourians.

Check out the Behind the Stories page for more from reporters about the stories.

Newspapers Make Sacrifices in Struggling Economy April 7, 2009

Posted by kbianews in KBIA.
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Business Beat 04/01/09

The economic downturn has hit Newspapers hard in the last year. The Columbia Missourian last month cut its print edition to five days a week from seven. Like many news organizations impacted by the financial crisis, newspapers have to make sacrifices. Columbia Missourian General Manager Dan Potter talks to host Sean Powers about how his newspaper is fairing during the financial crisis. Columbia’s Steve Sliker talks to Erica Smith who by day designs graphics for the St. Louis Post Dispatch and by night runs the blog, Paper Cuts, a database of newspaper layoffs and buyouts.

Is now the time to start a business? April 6, 2009

Posted by kbianews in KBIA.
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Joseph Haslag is the Ken Lay Chair of Economics at the University of Missouri.

Joseph Haslag is the Ken Lay Chair of Economics at the University of Missouri.

Business Beat 03/25/09

A report out by the U.S. Department of Labor says from January to February there were about 2,000 fewer initial claims for unemployment insurance in Missouri. Columbia Chamber of Commerce President Don Laird says now may actually be a good a time to start a small business. Not all small businesses setting up shop up by first time business owners. Walker Claridge, owner of Columbia’s Root Cellar, is opening up a new business right next door called the Broadway Brewery. In Columbia, Austin Coates takes a look inside. Also, the Obama administration formally announced the next phase of its approach this week to encourage lending between private investors and banks. Under the plan, the government will use $100 billion dollars in TARP funds to relieve banks of troubled “legacy” assets that are on their balance sheets. Treasury Secretary Geitner didn’t rule out the possibility of spending up to a trillion dollars down the road. This additional future spending could come from borrowing and printing new money. So, what happens when the Fed prints money? MU Economics professor Joseph Haslag has followed several possibilities to their logical conclusion. Here’s his commentary on how…when it comes to money and printing money…the trick is to get the right balance between supply and demand.